Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibitors Exert Pharmacological Effects, but Lack Antinociceptive Efficacy in Rats with Neuropathic Spinal Cord Injury Pain

Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibitors Exert Pharmacological Effects, but Lack Antinociceptive Efficacy in Rats with Neuropathic Spinal Cord Injury Pain

A number of studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid (CB) receptor leads to a robust antinociception in a variety of preclinical pain models [3].

The antinociceptive effects of nonselective CB receptor agonists in rats are blocked with either cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) or cannabinoid receptor type-2 (CB2) receptor antagonists. Limited clinical evidence and SCI patient survey suggests that CB receptor activation with CB ligands derived fromCannabis sativa reduces SCI pain [4][5]. In humans, the psychological and physiological effects of CB agonists are blocked by treatment with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141719A) indicating the importance of CB1 receptors in mediating the effects of CB [6].

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0096396#pone-0096396-g008


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