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What We Stand For

The ORG Vision - What We Stand For

Within the State of Ohio, we envision:

  • That no person, who makes therapeutic use of the cannabis plant or derivatives of it, will be subject to surveillance, confrontation, arrest, prosecution, prison, jail, forfeiture or other sanctions based on such use.
  • That those who make therapeutic use of the cannabis plant will have numerous forms of consumption available to them that best manifest the benefits of the plant for their particular need.
  • That those who make therapeutic use of cannabis will have a sufficient and continual quantity to meet their therapeutic needs.
  • That the cannabis made available for therapeutic use will be free of contaminants and possess sufficient potency to achieve the desired therapeutic effect.
  • That those who make therapeutic use of cannabis have the same rights to privacy and confidentiality, and to be as free from discrimination, as any other individual or patient.
  • That businesses, nonprofits and other types of organizations will have the greatest degree of freedom to operate, subject to reasonable regulations, in order to provide the quantities, products and services that are sufficient and continual to meet therapeutic needs.
  • That the industry developed to meet therapeutic needs operates in ethical, transparent, responsible and accountable ways that embody standards of best practice.
  • That the governmental bodies regulating the industry will be supportive of it, and will enact and enforce rules that are fair, unbiased, logical and constructive.
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Science Equals Safety, Right?

FDA Approvedby Laurie Oakley

Most mainstream medical experts would have us believe that a lack of scientific testing makes it unethical for doctors to encourage or recommend the use of cannabis as medicine. Research studies, especially randomized controlled clinical trials, are the gold standard in pharmaceutical testing to establish whether medicines are safe and effective. Pharmaceutical study results are analyzed by the FDA before approval which, they say, ensures patient safety.

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Hemp Fuel

Hemp fuels- Environmentally friendly fuel sources

The basics: Hemp can provide two types of fuel.
1.  Hemp biodiesel – made from the oil of the (pressed) hemp seed.
2.  Hemp ethanol/methanol – made from the fermented stalk.Biodiesel-pump-pic.png

To clarify further, ethanol is made from such things as grains, sugars, starches, waste paper and forest products, and methanol is made from woody/pulp matter. Using processes such as gasification, acid hydrolysis and enzymes, hemp can be used to make both ethanol and methanol.

In this day of oil wars, peak oil (and the accompanying soaring prices), climate change and oil spills such as the one in the gulf by BP, it’s more important than ever to promote sustainable alternatives such as hemp ethanol.  Hemp turns out to be the most cost-efficient and valuable of all the fuel crops we could grow on a scale that could fuel the world.

And as it turns out, the whole reason for hemp prohibition – and alcohol prohibition – may have been a fuel the realization that OIL production is threatened by any competing fuel source, especially one that requires no modifications to your car!

What is Hemp Biodiesel?
Hemp biodiesel is the name for a variety of ester based oxygenated fuels made from hemp oil.  The concept of using vegetable oil as an engine fuel dates back to 1895 when Dr. Rudolf Diesel developed the first diesel engine to run on vegetable oil. Diesel demonstrated his engine at the World Exhibition in Paris in 1900 using peanut oil as fuel.  Hemp biodiesel come from the pressing of the hemp seeds to extract the oil.  Through a process explainedhere , hemp biodiesel can be made.

Hemp biodiesel can be made from domestically produced, renewable oilseed crops such as hemp. With over 30 million successful U.S. road miles hemp biodiesel could be the answer to our cry for renewable fuel sources.  Learning more  about renewable fuels does not mean we should not cut back on consumption but does help address the environmental affects of our choices.  There is more to hemp as a renewable fuel source than you know

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Why Hemp Biodiesel?

  • Biodiesel is the only alternative fuel that runs in any conventional, unmodified diesel engine.
  • It can be stored anywhere that petroleum diesel fuel is stored. Biodiesel is safe to handle and transport because it is as biodegradable as sugar, 10 times less toxic than table salt, and has a high flashpoint of about 300 F compared to petroleum diesel fuel, which has a flash point of 125 F.
  • Biodiesel can be made from domestically produced, renewable oilseed crops such as hemp.
  • Biodiesel is a proven fuel with over 30 million successful US road miles, and over 20 years of use in Europe.
  • When burned in a diesel engine, biodiesel replaces the exhaust odor of petroleum diesel with the pleasant smell of hemp, popcorn or french fries.
  • Biodiesel is the only alternative fuel in the US to complete EPA Tier I Health Effects Testing under section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act, which provide the most thorough inventory of environmental and human health effects attributes that current technology will allow.
  • Biodiesel is 11% oxygen by weight and contains no sulfur.
  • The use of biodiesel can extend the life of diesel engines because it is more lubricating than petroleum diesel fuel, while fuel consumption, auto ignition, power output, and engine torque are relatively unaffected by biodiesel.
  • The Congressional Budget Office, Department of Defense, US Department of Agriculture, and others have determined that biodiesel is the low cost alternative fuel option for fleets to meet requirements of the Energy Policy Act.

Click here to view one method of making biodiesel with hemp seed oil


This Research and Resources page is sponsored by the Ohio Rights Group Education Fund.
Please support our charitable and educational work by making a generous tax deductible donation.


 

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Nutrition

Hemp seed as food

For various reasons, hemp has been reconsidered as a valuable industrial crop for both food and fiber in Canada and European countries during the last decade. As a result, hemp seed and hemp seed food products have become available to the general public in these countries. While the human food potential for hemp seed has not yet entered mass markets in the west, its nutritional properties have long been recognized and valued as food for both humans and domesticated animals throughout Asia, India, Russia and Eastern Europe. In China, roasted hemp seed is still sold as snacks by street vendors. In Russia, ‘black’ oil has been pressed from hemp seed and used as a substitute for more expensive (and less healthy) sources of dietary fat, such as butter and hydrogenated margarines.

The natural dark color of hemp seed oil is from chlorophyll within the mature seed, which can hasten auto-oxidation of oil that is exposed to light. Some traditional hemp seed foods can still be found in the Baltic States, particularly Latvia, and in other east European countries. Such a long history and a variety of uses over a large geographic area, and throughout so many different cultures, are all strong reminders of hemp seed’s utility as a useful source of nutrition. Over the past few years, modern science has finally begun to catch up with this ancient knowledge through its own methodologies. Read More 

HEMP SEED: THE MOST NUTRITIONALLY COMPLETE FOOD SOURCE IN THE WORLD

Seeds of the plant cannabis sativa, hemp seed, contain all the essential amino acids and essential fatty acids necessary to maintain healthy human life. No other single plant source has the essential amino acids in such an easily digestible form, nor has the essential fatty acids in as perfect a ratio to meet human nutritional needs. Read More

​Hemp Seed Oil Has Healthy Potential (Study)​

With an ideal ratio of omega-6 and -3 fatty acids and some plant chemicals thought to lower high blood pressure, hempseed oil has potential as part of a heart-healthy diet, according to Spanish researchers. Read More

Whats the Difference Between Hemp Seed and Hemp Seed Hearts?

Hemp seed hearts – also known as hemp hearts and hemp nuts – are raw whole hemp seeds that have had the outer shell removed. Hulled hemp seed hearts have a higher overall percentage of protein and are much sweeter and nuttier in flavour than the whole hemp seed.

Are Hemp Seed Hearts A Complete Source of Protein?

​Yes! Hemp offers 17 different amino acids including 8 of the 10 essential ones. This protein is relatively high in cysteine and methionine, which are two sulfur- bearing amino acids that vegetable proteins usually lack.

What Kind of Fats are in Hemp Seed Hearts​?

The oil from hemp seeds has one of the highest concentrations of polyunsaturated fats and the best balance of the Essential Fatty Acids. The human body requires only two fatty acids, Linoleic acid (omega 6) and alpha linolenic acid (omega 3) and their metabolites, gamma-linolenic acid (omega 6) and stearidonic acid (omega 3), in order to sustain life and health. Hemp contains 54.4% linoleic acid, 18.3% linolenic acid, 3-4% gamma-linolenic and 1-2% stearidonic acid. It’s one of only four oils to contain this balance of essential fatty acids and is the most economical option available.

The Cardiac and Haemostatic Effects of Dietary Hempseed

Despite its use in our diet for hundreds of years, hempseed has surprisingly little research published on its physiological effects. This may have been in the past because the psychotropic properties wrongly attributed to hemp would complicate any conclusions obtained through its study. Hemp has a botanical relationship to drug/medicinal varieties of Cannabis. However, hempseed no longer contains psychotropic action and instead may provide significant health benefits. Hempseed has an excellent content of omega-3 and omega-6

fatty acids. These compounds have beneficial effects on our cardiovascular health. Recent studies, mostly in animals, have examined the effects of these fatty acids and dietary hempseed itself on platelet aggregation, ischemic heart disease and other aspects of our cardiovascular health. The purpose of this article is to review the latest developments in this rapidly emerging research field with a focus on the cardiac and vascular effects of dietary hempseed.

​  Read More​

Nutr Metab (Lond). 2010; 7: 32.Published online Apr 21, 2010. doi:  10.1186/1743-7075-7-32

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This Research and Resources page is sponsored by the Ohio Rights Group Education Fund.
Please support our charitable and educational work by making a generous tax deductible donation.


 

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Endocannabinoids acting at cannabinoid-1 receptors regulate cardiovascular function in hypertension

Endocannabinoids acting at cannabinoid-1 receptors regulate cardiovascular function in hypertension

We conclude that endocannabinoids tonically suppress cardiac contractility in hypertension and that enhancing the CB1-mediated cardiodepressor and vasodilator effects of endogenous anandamide by blocking its hydrolysis can normalize blood pressure. Targeting the endocannabinoid system offers novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of hypertension.

(​PMID: 15451779 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] PMCID: PMC2756479 )​

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2756479/

 

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Anandamide Attenuates Th-17 Cell-Mediated Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Response by Triggering IL-10 Production and Consequent microRNA Induction

Anandamide Attenuates Th-17 Cell-Mediated Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Response by Triggering IL-10 Production and Consequent microRNA Induction

“Endogenous cannabinoids [endocannabinoids] are lipid signaling molecules that have been shown to modulate immune functions..

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Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Amelioration of Experimental Autoimmune Hepatitis Following Activation of TRPV1 Receptors by Cannabidiol

Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Amelioration of Experimental Autoimmune Hepatitis Following Activation of TRPV1 Receptors by Cannabidiol

“Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are getting increased attention as one of the main regulatory cells of the immune system. They are induced at sites of inflammation and can potently suppress T cell functions. In the current study, we demonstrate how activation of TRPV1 vanilloid receptors can trigger MDSCs, which in turn, can inhibit inflammation and hepatitis…

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Attenuation of experimental autoimmune hepatitis by exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids: involvement of regulatory T cells

Attenuation of experimental autoimmune hepatitis by exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids: involvement of regulatory T cells.

“Immune-mediated liver diseases including autoimmune and viral hepatitis are a major health problem worldwide. Natural cannabinoids such as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) effectively modulate immune cell function, and they have shown therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory diseases.

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Endocannabinoid CB1 antagonists inhibit hepatitis C virus production, providing a novel class of antiviral host targeting agents

Endocannabinoid CB1 antagonists inhibit hepatitis C virus production, providing a novel class of antiviral host targeting agents.

“Direct acting antivirals have significantly improved treatment outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), but side effects, drug resistance and cost mean that better treatments are still needed.

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